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3rd Semester Suggestions & Recommended Books for CSE

Created by silverbullet

silverbullet

silverbullet,

Hello everyone, this is Shivam from AIACT&R and I'll share my experience from my 3rd Semester along with some recommendations :)
Note : These are just my personal opinions.

Let's get started with the First most Important Subject.

Applied Mathematics III : V.P Mishra

You must be following this book till now most probably, but if you're in the 2nd category and following B.S Grehwal then its good if the book suits you. It is pretty conceptual and good for the sake of understanding but the questions in the examination are taken from VP Mishra. So if you want to score by studying on the last days then this book is for you. Practice all the examples thoroughly. If you still have time then go through them again. If you're still not satisfied then go for the unsolved questions :D

Fundamentals of Computer Science :

[Rosen](http://www.amazon.in/Discrete-Mathematics-Its-Applications-
SIE/dp/0070681880/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1468347510&sr=8-1&keywords=Rosen)

I totally loved this book so I bought it personally for long term use. You can learn a lot from this book if you read it seriously. This is an interesting and scoring subject and the exam is super easy. This subject will also help you build a logical mind which is important later. You will read about Permutations and Combinations, solving recurrences, graph theory, set theory and you will definitely have a good time if you study them with interest :)

Circuits and Systems :

K.M Soni

This is the only book you will need to score more than 80% easily. This is an ultra-easy-scoring subject :D Even if you're weak at solving circuits you can score more than 80% (like me :P). There are free marks in the last unit for solving Foster form and Cauer form(Free 16 marks for simple polynomial division). Unit 3 is also very easy, there is a set method to solve the questions, if you learn that then you're good to go!
Unit 1 and 2 is the most scoring, if you did Laplace transform in 2nd semester, its literally the same thing here.(Even if you didn't then its never too late, don't delay it any more, you're gonna lose free 8-12 marks otherwise :) ).

Switching Theory and logical Design (STLD):

Rishabh Anand & Deepak Gupta(Bhavya publications)
Neso Academy Lectures

This subject is pure beauty in my honest opinion. BUT it can easily fuck with you if you DON'T PRACTICE IT. I studied this subject using Neso Academy videos and it seems so easy when he's teaching it, like you're cent percent sure that you're not gonna score less than 90's in this subject, it seems like a piece of cake. But you need to practice the circuits, not once or twice but more than thrice!
In the first unit you will be dealing with basics of digital electronics, Logic gates/ Basic conversions from Binary to Decimal, Binary Addition/Subtraction,etc, K-Maps(a bit advanced, Quine Mc-Clusky method is a sure shot question). There are rules to memorize, they can be confusing at once, when to discard carry and when to consider it. You will definitely get confused, its fine and completely normal. Practice is the key. You will then explore the beauty of flip flops and their applications. Super easy and interesting, set questions from this part, like what is the race around condition in JK Flip flop, designing a MOD x counter( you can learn from the videos). You may get confused while making state tables and excitation tables, practice it well, for all types of flip flops. In the 3rd and 4th unit, designing ASM and FSM can be tricky, I'd suggest to do Fault detection if you have time, there's a sure shot question and people mostly leave it because its in the end but its theory and scoring.

CGM : Donald-Hearn

Again a scoring subject, In first unit there are super easy algorithms, you will get them in 1 or 2 examples, free marks in first unit again :D . Rest is also theoretical and easy, its interesting in its own way. If you're into gaming and graphics, then you can get to learn a lot, like Anti-aliasing, Ambient occlusion, etc. I've read the older version of the book, the one with a yellow color, but the latest edition is a bit different I think, I haven't come across it yet but try to compare both the editions and go with the one you feel comfortable with :)

Data Structures :

People generally buy Cormen with high hopes and excitements but only get it if you're a dedicated person towards programming, its the "Bible of Algorithms and Data structures". Its one hell of a technical book, you need a lot of patience and passion to read and understand this one. If you're just looking to pass this exam then don't even look at this book.
You can read Schaum Series if you like it, otherwise find out what suits you the best yourself. It totally depends on what you're looking for, you might find good theory in one while excellent examples in the other one. There is no such perfect book. You gotta take various resources and RIP the subject, that's what actually engineering is :) but still if you wanna pass the exam then you can go for Bhavya publications book, it is designed according to the IPU syllabus but you might find wrong stuff and maybe learn it and pass on to your friends too.

Also, here is another golden link MyCodeSchool lectures

So, let's get an insight to the subject, Here is your core subject CS people! Its now or never. You gotta do this one seriously and put maximum efforts in. Your 4th year interview and placements would be majorly dependent on your Data structure and Algorithms skills. You will discover linked list, binary trees, ternary trees, 2-3 trees, etc. There is a probable question of Reversal of linked list(Its an interview question too, try both iterative and recursive ways).1st unit is easy and covers the basics..postfix to prefix, stack,queues,etc. You are expected to know the implementation and working of insertion deletion and updation(all cases). 2nd unit can be a bit tricky when you explore Heaps and AVL trees, but its easy once you understand the working, you might even come across a 12 mark question(with a high probability) to show the status of an AVL Tree after a given set of symbols are inserted. Implementation of heaps is troublesome, I don't know why was it included in the syllabus in the first place. Unit 3 is a bit of theory but then there's graph theory, you should study BFS and DFS "BY HEART". These two are really really important algorithms and have tremendous applications to various problems. Implement it yourself, fail once or twice or even thrice. That's normal. Unit 4 is the most easiest according to me. Hashing and its resolution, piece of cake. But implement all the sorting techniques yourself. Find out which sorting technique is best when the data set is small, which is the most efficient when data set is large, What would you do if you have large chunks of data to be sorted, Time and space complexities of all of them, how they work,etc.

So that's it folks!
If you have any queries then shoot right away :)

Last updated

AnsuKumari

AnsuKumari,

Can you please update the name of the CGM book? :grin:

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silverbullet

silverbullet,

Hey, I've updated the post :) Cheers.

Last updated

AnsuKumari

AnsuKumari,

Great, thank you :smiley:

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